Difference between revisions of "Maw of Fenris"

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In Norse mythology [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenrir Fenrir] (also known as Fenris), is a monstrous wolf and son of the trickster god [[Loki]]. During Ragnarok it is foreseen by [[Odin]] that Fenrir will kill him, and that Fenrir himself will be slain by the god of vengeance Vidar. Because of these prophesies the Norse gods bound Fenrir in hopes of negating their downfall.
 
In Norse mythology [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenrir Fenrir] (also known as Fenris), is a monstrous wolf and son of the trickster god [[Loki]]. During Ragnarok it is foreseen by [[Odin]] that Fenrir will kill him, and that Fenrir himself will be slain by the god of vengeance Vidar. Because of these prophesies the Norse gods bound Fenrir in hopes of negating their downfall.
  
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==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
 
[[Category:Canon]][[Category:Library]][[Category:Spirituality]]
 
[[Category:Canon]][[Category:Library]][[Category:Spirituality]]

Revision as of 23:45, 1 February 2014

Odin and Fenris (1909) by Dorothy Hardy

The Maw of Fenris is a cult that considers the wolf Fenris to be a deity and worship him. In Norse mythology, the end of days, known as Ragnarok is instigated when Fenris kills the the god Odin. The Maw of Fenris see Ragnarok not as a story, but as a action plan to wipe out all of humanity, leaving only werewolves to dominate the planet. Members of the Maw are known to wear silver bullets around their necks, with Ragnarok etched into them.

The Maw of Fenris was thought to be a dead order once Reverend Jim Myers took over the congregation, and preached co-existence instead of dominance. [1]

Ragnarok etched on a silver bullet belonging to Sheriff Pat.
The Book of Fenris.
Page from the Book of Fenris detailing Ragnarok.

Fenrir in Lore

In Norse mythology Fenrir (also known as Fenris), is a monstrous wolf and son of the trickster god Loki. During Ragnarok it is foreseen by Odin that Fenrir will kill him, and that Fenrir himself will be slain by the god of vengeance Vidar. Because of these prophesies the Norse gods bound Fenrir in hopes of negating their downfall.

References